Episode 134

Poor decision-making by the pilot is showcased in the examination of a Piper PA-24 crash in Angel Fire, New Mexico. The Flight Safety Detectives find that the NTSB report of this air crash provides helpful information and findings that every pilot can learn from.

Greg, John and Todd review the facts, conditions and circumstances of the accident to amplify the role of the pilot’s decisions before and during the flight. A lack of preparation led to this crash and two fatalities.

The pilot was not prepared for the gusty winds present at takeoff. He was also not familiar with the high-density altitude conditions common during hot weather at this airport. Todd estimates the pilot had about 45 seconds between realizing something was wrong and hitting the ground.

For links related to this episode, visit flightsafetydetectives.com

Don’t miss what’s to come from the Flight safety Detectives - subscribe to the Flight Safety Detectives YouTube channel, listen at your favorite podcast service and visit the Flight Safety Detectives website.

Episode 133

An accident involving a Hughes 269C helicopter demonstrates the lack of depth in accidents attributed to maintenance errors. Once again, there is no analysis on the human factors involved among maintenance personnel.

The NTSB probable cause for this air crash points to an improperly installed mounting bracket on the engine. The supporting details and aviation insights are lacking.

“My frustration is that they go no further than to say this is a maintenance issue,” John Goglia says. “No human factors are explored although that is as important in maintenance as it is in the cockpit.”

John, Greg and Todd find many questions unanswered. They discuss the value in going deeper than “maintenance screwed up.”

They explore the many questions not investigated that could lead to information that people can learn from. They talk about why even the most benign accidents can result in aviation safety benefits. This accident report is among many that are a disservice to the aviation community because it is superficial.

Also in this episode, Greg retracts a Episode 131 statement that 50% of NTSB probably causes are wrong. He does not have sufficient documentation to support the statement. However, he stands by his statement that he is confident that at least half of NTSB reports are incomplete.

Episode 132

FAA Advisory Circular 60-22 just may save your life. The document looks at aeronautical decision making and five hazardous attitudes.

In the cockpit, on the hangar floor and in life, the Flight Safety Detectives say this information provides critical insight for everyone in aviation.

Greg, John and Todd use a Cirrus SR 22 air crash in Midland, Texas to illustrate how poor decision-making puts pilots and passengers at risk. Hear as they make the case for everyone in aviation to apply this insight to their work and life.

Pilots who don’t recognize their own limitations and rationalize poor decisions cause accidents. This free document can save your life.

Episode 131

Continuing the discussion started in Episode 128, the deficiencies of the NTSB report of a plane crash in Palo Alto are laid out. John, Greg, and Todd conclude that the report actually contributes to the problem of inaccurate data leading to time and money being spent on the wrong aviation safety issues.

Estimates are that more than 50 percent of NTSB reports are inaccurate, incorrect or outright wrong. This report is highlighted as a case in point.

Greg outlines several questions not answered – or incorrectly addressed – in the report. Here are just a few:

  • The departure clearance provided calls to turn right after takeoff, but the pilot turned left. Why?
  • Both engines were working. Why was the aircraft so low following takeoff?
  • Why did the NTSB spend so much time looking at the engines and no time looking at instrumentation?

“There are many issues with open questions that are not answered,” Greg says. “This is not a beneficial report to understand the cause or contributing factors.”

Todd adds that the media coverage of the air crash characterized the pilot as experienced and dedicated to safe operations. Yet, the NTSB did not look into what would lead him to make the errors apparent that day.

Listen to find out why the Flight Safety Detectives think this report does a disservice to the pilot, other victims and aviation safety overall.

Don’t miss what’s to come from the Flight safety Detectives - subscribe to the Flight Safety Detectives YouTube channel, listen at your favorite podcast service and visit the Flight Safety Detectives website.

 

Episode 130

Ever wonder how to get details on aviation accidents? You may be surprised to learn that many incidents don’t get added to the NTSB online database.

The Flight Safety Detectives share how they find aviation incident information, from basic Google searches to Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) requests.

“Most people don’t realize that many accidents are investigated by the FAA, not the NTSB,” John says. “And there are many databases out there that can have information.”

The example of wing strike incident with a rental aircraft used by Todd is used to show the steps that can be taken to get information.

John and Todd encourage anyone with interest in a particular incident or aviation in general to explore the information available. Knowledge is power and is the basis for the aviation safety improvements.

The episode also covers the many career opportunities related to aviation, in the air and on the ground.

Don’t miss what’s to come from the Flight safety Detectives - subscribe to the Flight Safety Detectives YouTube channel, listen at your favorite podcast service and visit the Flight Safety Detectives website.

Episode 129

A look at the broad community of support available to today’s general aviation pilots. Todd is discovering rich resources that are helpful to every pilot as he returns to the cockpit after many years.

“Flight instructors are a wealth of knowledge, but pilots still need more,” says Todd.

He and John discuss several important resources:

  • Aviation-specific weather available 24/7/365, forecast and up-to-the-minute
  • YouTube videos that provide education on large and small topics
  • Updated regulations online

Todd also shares resources he has used to prepare for the various qualification exams. He explains his strategies for getting the most of these resources.

They also discuss the value of Freedom of Information Act Requests – now easy to do online – to learn about specific incidents. Todd shares what he has learned from recent requests.

Don’t miss what’s to come from the Flight safety Detectives - subscribe to the Flight Safety Detectives YouTube channel, listen at your favorite podcast service and visit the Flight Safety Detectives website.

Episode 128

The NTSB report of a 2010 Cessna 310R air crash in Palo Alto, California gets mixed reviews. Todd’s impressed by a sound study used to recreate the flight path, and John finds lots of detail in the examination of the wreckage, engine and prop. The positive first impression falls apart when Greg highlights missing details.

The report does not answer many questions, including:

  • Appropriateness of unusual air traffic control instructions to “take off at your own risk”
  • Why the pilot turned left rather than right shortly after takeoff
  • How 200 knot speed was achieved just 14 seconds after takeoff

The “ridiculous” probable cause statement relies on the obvious and doesn’t reflect the facts documented in the report.

The Flight Safety Detectives raise questions that need to be answered to find the aviation safety lessons to be learned from this accident. They raise questions about this aircraft crash that will continued to be explored in the next episode.

Don’t miss what’s to come from the Flight safety Detectives - subscribe to the Flight Safety Detectives YouTube channel, listen at your favorite podcast service and visit the Flight Safety Detectives website.

Episode 127

A look beyond the NTSB documentation of a Cessna 421C crash in Florida. Greg and John review the many important “whys’ not answered in the report.

Why did the pilot not properly follow procedures to handle engine failure despite completing a training program just 90 days earlier?

Why was a pilot who had recently completed a certified training program so ill prepared for handle an engine failure scenario?

Why was there loss of torque in several bolts and other internal engine damage?

“A lot of valuable safety information could have been uncovered and shared for the benefit of the industry, especially general aviation,” Greg says. John adds that the hesitation to dig into anything that happens inside the maintenance hangar prevents maintenance personnel from learning all they can from accidents.

Armed with the proper information and training, the pilot in this accident could have dealt with the engine failure, kept airspeed, and made a controlled landing. Greg and John want other pilots to benefit from these safety findings.

Don’t miss what’s to come from the Flight safety Detectives - subscribe to the Flight Safety Detectives YouTube channel, listen at your favorite podcast service and visit the Flight Safety Detectives website.

Report for accident number ERA13FA082

Public docket for accident report ERA13FA082

Episode 126

Poor pilot training is a central cause of a Cessna 421C crash in Florida. The NTSB report documents the crash, but misses the opportunity to fully analyze the training failures. With the number of accidents that involve training issues on the rise, the Flight Safety Detectives dig into this accident to share important safety takeaways.

“The good news is that pilot training quality issues are on the radar of FAA inspectors,” John says. He and Greg agree that attention and improvements can’t come quick enough.

Many recent accidents show obvious training deficiencies among new and experienced pilots. John and Greg heard from many people at EAA AirVenture Oshkosh that this is an issue that needs to be discussed.

This episode offers background information on a December 2012 crash in Florida. The pilot had 1200+ flight hours, and just 1.5 hours in the accident aircraft. Contributing issues include maintenance, operational, and training deficiencies. John and Greg set the stage to cover these in more detail in the next episode.

Many listeners visited with John, Greg and Todd at the Avemco booth at Oshkosh. The feedback will be used to shape future episodes. Don’t miss what’s to come - subscribe to the Flight Safety Detectives YouTube channel, listen at your favorite podcast service and visit the Flight Safety Detectives website.

Report for accident number ERA13FA082

Public docket for accident report ERA13FA082

Episode 125

You never know what you will learn at the Avemco Insurance booth! John, Greg and Todd are at EAA AirVenture Oshkosh. A conversation with a pilot and listener revealed a story of an air disaster averted that the Flight Safety Detectives had to share. Hear about Heather’s flight that resulted in a damaged prop and landing gear.

“I caption this story, ‘Am I really ready,’” says Greg. “It’s an important lesson every pilot and aspiring pilot needs to hear.”

Heather shares what happened during a solo flight to a new airport. It was her first straight in approach and a bounce on landing caused damage that she was initially unaware of. She’s examined what happened and shares what she did well as well as mistakes she doesn’t want other pilots to make.

This story could have been another air disaster, but instead offers important insights for anyone who wants to succeed in the cockpit.

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